Rafael Hui’s Music & Video Collection For Sale; Mine Too

A few days ago, the SCMP reported that former government official and convicted felon is selling off his collection of 11,000 CDs, vinyl lps and video discs (LDs? DVDs?) now that he’s bankrupt and with debts of HK$75 million.

Hui gave up his entire music library, the fruit of a collection craze since the 1960s, to trustees John Lees and Mat Ng of JLA Asia after the High Court declared him bankrupt in November last year.

Ng, managing director of JLA Asia, said they had been advertising in newspapers and on a website to sell the music and film records, which were divided into 11 categories according to the genre. The trustees had also contacted individual collectors to inspect the huge collection.

“We have received some offers and are still open to accepting more offers,” Ng said.

“We prefer to find a single collector to buy the whole lot, but we may also split the collection into two or more batches if that can achieve a higher sale price.”

HMV Hong Kong product manager Michelle Tang said she had inspected the lot. “The collection is very old and in very bad condition. We have little interest to submit a bid,” she told the South China Morning Post. “Hui seemed to have bought the music for his own enjoyment.”

All these assets were part of the lavish lifestyle Hui testified to leading. He freely indulged in his fetish for classical music, resulting in the collection of 10,955 discs – mainly vinyl LPs – that includes 6,323 classical music albums, 965 titles on operas and ballet, 1,330 jazz and blues records and 835 rock and pop discs, many of which are Beatles albums from the 1960s.

There are also local discs, including 140 LPs by Canto-pop singers such as Alan Tam Wing-lun, Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing and Anita Mui Yim-fong.

The hobby cost him millions of dollars. He admitted spending HK$200,000 in a single day buying albums, and going on overseas trips for opera concerts that cost more than HK$200,000.

He said Hui liked to shop for records during lunchtime. Hong Kong Records, HMV and smaller shops in Admiralty and Wan Chai were his favourites.

An employee at one of the stores said Hui came at least once a week when he was in government, but had not visited since his arrest in 2012. “He spent almost HK$10,000 per visit. He likes to order whole collections or some rare copies of classical music, and he bought mainly vinyl.”

My collection isn’t quite as massive as Hui’s. I never spent HK$10,000 per visit to any shop, anywhere, at any time. But I did work in the music industry in the 80s and the home video industry in the 00’s, and wrote for various publications on and off since the 70s, so I’ve had periods in my life when a fair share of free stuff was coming my way. Even so, over the years, I spent way too much money feeding this particular addiction.

I sold off most of my vinyl in 2001, just before moving to Hong Kong for the second time. (I still have a few boxes, mostly oddball items and rarities, a bunch of picture discs and shaped discs, a few autographed records here and there.)

I’ve got somewhere in the neighborhood of 6,000 CDs and I’m trying to unload roughly 2,500 of them prior to my move to Manila. I’ve probably got around 3,000 DVDs and maybe another 500 or 1,000 Blu-Rays and am putting together a list of what I plan to sell of those. Then there are 200 or 300 laser discs – I’ve also mostly held on to a few real oddball items there, such as an edit of Godfather 1 and 2 that never appeared elsewhere on video and a once-very-sought-after THX demo disc, amongst others. No idea what I’ll be doing with those.